Norwegian wins Iditarod sled dog race across Alaska: 9 days, 12 hrs


ANCHORAGE, Alaska (Reuters) – A Norwegian musher received the Iditarod Trail Sled Puppy Race early on Wednesday, notching the 3rd victory at any time for his household nation in the 46-12 months background of the annual 1,000-mile (1609-km) trek across Alaska’s wilderness.

Joar Leifseth Ulsom of Norway celebrates successful the Iditarod Trail Sled Puppy Race, the annual 1,000-mile (1609-km) trek across Alaska’s wilderness, in Nome, Alaska, U.S., March 14, 2018. REUTERS/Nils Hahn/The Nome Nugget

Joar Leifseth Ulsom, the dogsled driver, arrived at the complete line shortly right after 2:30 a.m. community time (1030 GMT) right after nine times and 12 hrs to turn out to be the next Norwegian to gain the 1,000-mile Iditarod. Countryman Robert Sorlie received 2 times before – in 2003 and yet again in 2005.

Ulsom was greeted by Nome’s mayor and crowds of supporters who lined Nome’s snow-lined Entrance Street, including just one waving a Norwegian flag.

     In the complete chute, Ulsom said he had dreamed of successful the Iditarod at any time given that Sorlie did.

    “It’s rather unreal that we pulled it off,” he said.

Deep snow and warmer temperature, with temperatures at moments topping the freezing mark, slowed the tempo of this year’s race. Last 12 months, a few-time winner Mitch Seavey set a file of 8 times, a few hrs, 40 minutes and 13 seconds in tough-packed circumstances.

Ulsom, driving a crew of 8 pet dogs, jumped into initially position on Monday when he passed French native Nicolas Petit on the Bering Sea ice. Petit, who had held a comfortable guide, went astray as he ventured into blowing snow and shed the path, forcing him to backtrack.

Joar Leifseth Ulsom of Norway celebrates successful the Iditarod Trail Sled Puppy Race, the annual 1,000-mile (1609-km) trek across Alaska’s wilderness, in Nome, Alaska, U.S., March 14, 2018. REUTERS/Nils Hahn/The Nome Nugget

Petit told the Anchorage Everyday News that he was led off-class by some markers left around from the Iron Puppy snowmobile race.

By midday on Tuesday, Ulsom and Petit and their pet dogs had paused in the Inupiat Eskimo village of White Mountain, a required 8-hour rest end before the final sprint to the complete line in Nome, a coastal Gold Rush town 77 miles (124 km)to the west.

The 31-12 months-aged Ulsom, from the Norwegian town of Mo i Rana, just south of the Arctic Circle, has completed in the best 7 in all of his earlier Iditarod races, and was the quickest-at any time rookie in 2013.

Petit, 36, grew up in France’s Normandy area and moved to Alaska in 1992. He lives in the ski town of Girdwood.

Sixty-7 mushers and their pet dogs started off the Iditarod in Anchorage on March 3. As of Wednesday morning, 8 had droppedout. Most Iditarod mushers are from Alaska, but every single 12 months various Norwegians compete in the race.

Ulsom and the other Iditarod mushers who abide by him across the complete line around the following various hrs and times will break up a $500,000 prize purse. As initially-position champion, Ulsom also will get a new pickup truck.

Four-time Iditarod champion Dallas Seavey, Mitch Seavey’s son, withdrew from this year’s Iditarod following a pet-doping scandal. Four of his pet dogs analyzed beneficial for a banned opioid right after final year’s race. Seavey has said he is harmless, accused Iditarod officials of botching his situation and recommended that he was the victim of sabotage.

Rather, the more youthful Seavey was in Norway during the Iditarod, in which he was major in the 1,100-kilometer (682-mile) Finnmarksløpet.

Enhancing by Jeffrey Benkoe



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